Risk factors for development of surgical site infections among liver transplantation recipients

Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication in the postoperative period of recipients of liver transplantation | American Journal of Infection Control

Highlights: 

  • There is a little research about surgical site infection in liver transplantation.
  • Liver transplant recipients are exposed to different risk factors for SSI.
  • There is no consensus in literature about risk factor for SSI among LT recipients.

Full reference: Oliveira, R.A. et al. (2017) Risk factors for development of surgical site infections among liver transplantation recipients: An integrative literature review. American Journal of Infection Control | Available online: 6th July 2017

 

Patient engagement with surgical site infection prevention

Tartari E, et al. (2017) Patient engagement with surgical site infection prevention: an expert panel perspective. Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control | Published online: 12 May 2017

feedback-2044700_960_720

Despite remarkable developments in the use of surgical techniques, ergonomic advancements in the operating room, and implementation of bundles, surgical site infections (SSIs) remain a substantial burden, associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs.

National and international recommendations to prevent SSIs have been published, including recent guidelines by the World Health Organization, but implementation into clinical practice remains an unresolved issue. SSI improvement programs require an integrative approach with measures taken during the pre-, intra- and postoperative care from the numerous stakeholders involved.

The current SSI prevention strategies have focused mainly on the role of healthcare workers (HCWs) and procedure related risk factors. The importance and influence of patient participation is becoming an increasingly important concept and advocated as a means to improve patient safety. Novel interventions supporting an active participative role within SSI prevention programs have not been assessed. Empowering patients with information they require to engage in the process of SSI prevention could play a major role for the implementation of recommendations.

Based on available scientific evidence, a panel of experts evaluated options for patient involvement in order to provide pragmatic recommendations for pre-, intra- and postoperative activities for the prevention of SSIs. Recommendations were based on existing guidelines and expert opinion. As a result, 9 recommendations for the surgical patient are presented here, including a practice brief in the form of a patient information leaflet. HCWs can use this information to educate patients and allow patient engagement.

Read the full article here

The impact of surgical site infection on healthcare costs and patient outcomes

Badia, J.M. et al. The Journal of hospital Infection | Published online: 8 March 2017

domino-163522_960_720.jpg

Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, SSIs constitute a financial burden and negatively impact on patient quality of life (QoL).

Conclusion: Disparate reporting of SSIs makes direct cost comparisons difficult, however this review indicated that SSIs are extremely costly. Thus, rigorous procedures must be implemented to minimise SSIs. More economic and QoL studies are required to make accurate cost estimates and understand the true burden of SSIs.

Read the full abstract here

An audit of Caesarean section surgical site infections with single-use negative pressure wound therapy

Searle, R. & Myers, D. The Journal of Hospital Infection. Published online: February 28, 2017

This article reports audit data from the introduction of a new single-use negative pressure wound therapy system (PICO) for Caesarean section (CS) patients with high body mass index (BMI) in four hospitals in the UK and Ireland. PICO was used on closed surgical incisions following CS in 399 patients with BMI≥35. 36/399 patients (9.0%) developed signs of SSI, a rate lower than a previously reported incidence of 19.3% in a similar population. The readmission incidence was 0.8%. Therefore the use of PICO on closed surgical incisions may be associated with low incidence of SSI and readmission in this high-risk group.

Read the abstract here

Collaboration with an infection control team for patients with infection after spine surgery

Kobayashi, K. et al. American Journal of Infection Control. Published online: 22 February 2017

hands-1691221_960_720.png

Highlights: 

  • The risk of infection after spine surgery has increased due to aging of society.
  • An infection control team (ICT) manages infected cases at our hospital.
  • The ICT guided use of antibiotics in 30 cases and investigated infection in 10.
  • The bacteria detection rate was 88% (35/40 patients) in cases treated by the ICT.
  • Early assistance from the ICT is a key to preventing onset of MRSA infection.

Read the full abstract here

NICE guideline update – Surgical site infections: prevention and treatment

Surveillance report 2017 – Surgical site infections: prevention and treatment (2008) | NICE guideline CG74

nice-guidance

Surveillance decision: We will plan an update of the guideline on prevention and treatment of surgical site infections. The update will focus on:

  • nasal decontamination of Staphylococcus aureus
  • choice of preoperative skin antiseptics
  • application of intraoperative topical antiseptics/antimicrobials before wound closure
  • type of suture.

We will consider intraoperative perfusion and hydration, and intraoperative blood glucose control in a new guideline on perioperative care. Recommendations in the surgical site infection guideline will be withdrawn on publication of new recommendations in the perioperative care guideline.

Read the full update here

Dressings for the prevention of surgical site infection

Dumville, J.C et al. (2016) Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews . Issue 12. Art. No.: CD00309

cochrane

Image source: Cochrane

Background: Surgical wounds (incisions) heal by primary intention when the wound edges are brought together and secured, often with sutures, staples, or clips. Wound dressings applied after wound closure may provide physical support, protection and absorb exudate. There are many different types of wound dressings available and wounds can also be left uncovered (exposed). Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication of wounds and this may be associated with using (or not using) dressings, or different types of dressing.

Authors’ conclusions: It is uncertain whether covering surgical wounds healing by primary intention with wound dressings reduces the risk of SSI, or whether any particular wound dressing is more effective than others in reducing the risk of SSI, improving scarring, reducing pain, improving acceptability to patients, or is easier to remove. Most studies in this review were small and at a high or unclear risk of bias. Based on the current evidence, decision makers may wish to base decisions about how to dress a wound following surgery on dressing costs as well as patient preference.

Read the full review here