Reducing antibiotic prescribing for children presenting to primary care with acute respiratory tract infection

Blair, P.S. et al. (2017) BMJ Open. 7:e014506

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Objective: To investigate recruitment and retention, data collection methods and the acceptability of a ‘within-consultation’ complex intervention designed to reduce antibiotic prescribing.

Conclusion: Differential recruitment may explain the paradoxical antibiotic prescribing rates. Future cluster level studies should consider designs which remove the need for individual consent postrandomisation and embed the intervention within electronic primary care records.

Read the full article here

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Respiratory tract infections: infection control in healthcare settings

Guidance on transmission routes and precautions in healthcare settings | PHE

B0010277 Rhinovirus

Image source: David S. Goodsell, RCSB Protein Data Bank – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 

Image shows molecular model from X-ray diffraction data of a rhinovirus particle.

Avoiding transmission of acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings can prevent considerable mortality, morbidity and healthcare costs. Patients in healthcare settings, which include acute hospitals, outpatient clinics, A&E departments, specialised units and primary care, are often vulnerable because of age or chronic disease, and may suffer more severe disease or complications from acute respiratory infections.

This document summarises recommendations for the prevention and control of  acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings for clinical and public health colleagues. Preventing infection in healthcare settings requires the consistent application of infection control measures by healthcare workers and the involvement of the local infection control team. It also requires efforts to: maximise coverage of seasonal influenza vaccine among vulnerable groups and healthcare workers, and limit the spread of infection by visitors or infected staff, as well as general education and awareness-raising.

Read the full guidance here

Respiratory tract infections: infection control in healthcare settings

Guidance on transmission routes and precautions in healthcare settings | PHE

B0010277 Rhinovirus

Image source: David S. Goodsell, RCSB Protein Data Bank – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 

Image shows molecular model from X-ray diffraction data of a rhinovirus particle.

Avoiding transmission of acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings can prevent considerable mortality, morbidity and healthcare costs. Patients in healthcare settings, which include acute hospitals, outpatient clinics, A&E departments, specialised units and primary care, are often vulnerable because of age or chronic disease, and may suffer more severe disease or complications from acute respiratory infections.

This document summarises recommendations for the prevention and control of  acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings for clinical and public health colleagues. Preventing infection in healthcare settings requires the consistent application of infection control measures by healthcare workers and the involvement of the local infection control team. It also requires efforts to: maximise coverage of seasonal influenza vaccine among vulnerable groups and healthcare workers, and limit the spread of infection by visitors or infected staff, as well as general education and awareness-raising.

Read the full guidance here

A Comprehensive Review of Common Respiratory Infections Encountered in Urgent and Primary Care

Beam, C. et al. Journal of Emergency Nursing. Published online: 21 July 2016

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Concern about antibiotic overuse has become heightened as bacterial resistance to antibiotics continues to increase. Patients experiencing respiratory symptoms frequently present to urgent/emergent care settings such as fast-track emergency care departments and primary care retail settings with the expectation that they will be prescribed antibiotics.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that approximately 2 million people will become ill with bacteria that are resistant to at least one antibiotic, approximately 23,000 people die as a direct result of these infections, and many others die as a result of complications related to antibiotic-resistant infections.
Read the abstract here

A Comprehensive Review of Common Respiratory Infections Encountered in Urgent and Primary Care

Beam, C. et al. Journal of Emergency Nursing. Published online: July 21 2016

this-digitally-colorized-negative-stained-transmission-electron-micograph-tem-depicted-a-number-of-influenza-a-virions-634x544

Image shows digitally colorized electron micograph of influenza virions 

Concern about antibiotic overuse has become heightened as bacterial resistance to antibiotics continues to increase. Patients experiencing respiratory symptoms frequently present to urgent/emergent care settings such as fast-track emergency care departments and primary care retail settings with the expectation that they will be prescribed antibiotics.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that approximately 2 million people will become ill with bacteria that are resistant to at least one antibiotic, approximately 23,000 people die as a direct result of these infections, and many others die as a result of complications related to antibiotic-resistant infections.

Read the abstract here