NICE will not update guidance on Antimicrobial stewardship: systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use (2015) NICE guideline NG15

 NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence)  check their guidelines regularly to ensure they remain up to date. They have decided not to update the guideline on antimicrobial stewardship at this time. NICE based the decision on surveillance 2 years after the publication of NICE’s guideline on antimicrobial stewardship (NICE guideline NG15) in 2015. 

Reason for the decision

Assessing the evidence

For this guideline,  NICE checked any policy or other guidance documents that had been issued or updated since NICE guideline NG15 was published. They also checked any Cochrane reviews related to the guideline – this included any updates to the 4 Cochrane reviews used to inform the recommendations during development of the guideline, as well as any new Cochrane reviews published since October 2014 when the original search took place.  In addition, NICE also  checked for any relevant National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Signals. Each piece of evidence was checked against the guideline recommendations to assess any potential impact.

The policy, Cochrane reviews and NIHR Signals NICE examined did not indicate a need to update the guideline, therefore we did not undertake a formal evidence review. Furthermore, members of the original guideline committee were in agreement that there had been no substantial changes to the evidence base that would affect the guideline at this point .

NICE also checked for any relevant ongoing studies, and the impact of any publications arising from these in future will be monitored.

Overall decision 

 After considering the evidence described above as well as the views of topic experts and stakeholders, NICE  proposes  to not update this guideline.

See how NICE made the decision for further information

 

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NICE guideline update – Surgical site infections: prevention and treatment

Surveillance report 2017 – Surgical site infections: prevention and treatment (2008) | NICE guideline CG74

nice-guidance

Surveillance decision: We will plan an update of the guideline on prevention and treatment of surgical site infections. The update will focus on:

  • nasal decontamination of Staphylococcus aureus
  • choice of preoperative skin antiseptics
  • application of intraoperative topical antiseptics/antimicrobials before wound closure
  • type of suture.

We will consider intraoperative perfusion and hydration, and intraoperative blood glucose control in a new guideline on perioperative care. Recommendations in the surgical site infection guideline will be withdrawn on publication of new recommendations in the perioperative care guideline.

Read the full update here

Tackling falling child vaccination rates

vaccination-1215279_960_720NICE is developing priorities to help ensure unvaccinated children across the country get the protection they need.  In some areas of the country, fewer than 1 in 5 children are vaccinated against diseases such as polio and diphtheria. Experts have warned that unless uptake rates improve there is a risk of these diseases making a comeback.

Last year only a quarter of local authorities met World Health Organization targets to vaccinate 95% of children against measles, mumps and rubella.  A draft quality standard from NICE, out for consultation until 29 September, sets out how to drive up the number of under 19s who receive vaccinations.

Healthcare-associated infections NICE quality standard [QS113]

This new quality standard covers organisational factors in preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections in secondary care settings.

NICE quality standards describe high-priority areas for quality improvement in a defined care or service area. Each standard consists of a prioritised set of specific, concise and measurable statements. They draw on existing guidance, which provides an underpinning, comprehensive set of recommendations, and are designed to support the measurement of improvement.

This quality standard covers organisational factors in preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections in secondary care settings.

Organisational factors include management arrangements, policies, procedures, monitoring, evaluation, audit and accountability.

Secondary care settings include hospital buildings and grounds; inpatient, day case and outpatient facilities and services; elective and emergency care facilities; and hospital maternity units and services.

nICE infections

View the full quality standard here