Measles, mumps and rubella in England

Laboratory confirmed cases of measles, mumps and rubella, England: January to March 2018 | Health Protection Report Volume 12 Number 19 | Public Health England

This latest Quarterly report, provides commentary on cases confirmed by Public Health England’s Virus Reference Department.

Measles:

  • In England, 265 new measles infections were confirmed in the first quarter of 2018
    compared to 149 in the period between October and December 2017
  • In this quarter there has been a relative increase in confirmed cases amongst adults with 42% confirmed cases in adults aged 20 years and above compared with 19% in the previous quarter. 11% confirmed cases occurred in infants under the age of 1; this is higher than the 7% reported in the previous quarter. The hospitalisation rate remains high at 36%, although lower than the previous quarter (45%).

Laboratory confirmed cases of measles by month of onset of
rash/symptoms reported, London and England: January 2014 to March 2018

measles
Image source: http://www.gov.uk under the Open Government Licence v3.0

Mumps:

  • An increase in mumps activity in England was observed this quarter with 275 laboratory confirmed mumps infections compared to the 160 the previous quarter, in line with usual seasonal trends and similar to levels observed in quarter 1 of 2017
  • Mumps cases were reported in all regions of England predominantly in young
    adults aged 15 to 24 years

Full document: Laboratory-confirmed cases of measles, mumps and rubella (England): January to March 2018 | Health Protection Report | Volume 12 Number 19

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What You Should Know About Mumps: A Disease From the Past Makes a Resurgence

Mumps may seem like a contagion relegated to history books, but like many other diseases of the past now preventable with a vaccine, mumps has been making a resurgence | Infection Control Today

B0006271 Mumps virus protein in cultured cells
Image source: Paul Duprex – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 

Cases are at 10-year high and are especially common on college campuses across the country. Now the Dallas area is seeing the largest outbreak in Texas in years. Cristie Columbus, MD, vice dean of the Texas A&M College of Medicine’s Dallas campus and an infectious disease specialist, explains what people need to know about the mumps.

What is mumps?: Mumps is caused by a virus, specifically a type of Rubulavirus in the Paramyxovirus family. Before the vaccine was widely introduced in the United States in 1967, nearly every child would become infected. Although cases have declined more than 99 percent since then, outbreaks do still occasionally occur.

What are the symptoms of mumps?: The classic symptom of mumps is swollen salivary glands, which causes puffy cheeks and a swollen jaw that can make it difficult to eat. Other symptoms, which last seven to 10 days, may include a fever, fatigue and head and muscle aches. Some people—possibly as many as 40 percent of those infected—may have only very mild symptoms (if they have any at all), and therefore might not realize they have the disease. Still, they may be able to spread the virus to others.

How long after being infected do symptoms usually appear?: Symptoms can appear between 12 and 25 days after the initial infection, but usually people begin experiencing them 16 to 18 days after they are infected.

Read the full overview here