Reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the ICU

This review provides a summary of CAUTI reduction strategies that are specific to the intensive care setting | Current Opinion in Critical Care

Patients in the ICU are at higher risk for catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) due to more frequent use of catheters and lower threshold for obtaining urine cultures.

The surveillance definition for CAUTI is imprecise and measures catheter-associated bacteriuria rather than true infection. Alternatives have been proposed, but CAUTI rates measured by this definition are currently required to be reported to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and high CAUTI rates can result in financial penalties. Although CAUTI may not directly result in significant patient harm, it has several indirect patient safety implications and CAUTI reduction has several benefits. Various bundles have been successful at reducing CAUTI both in individual institutions and on larger scales such as healthcare networks and entire states.

Full reference: Sampathkumar, P. (2017) Reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the ICU. Current Opinion in Critical Care. Vol. 23 (Issue 5) pp. 372–377

 

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Reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the ICU

This review provides a summary of CAUTI reduction strategies that are specific to the intensive care setting | Current Opinion in Critical Care

Purpose of review: Patients in the ICU are at higher risk for catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) due to more frequent use of catheters and lower threshold for obtaining urine cultures.

Recent findings: The surveillance definition for CAUTI is imprecise and measures catheter-associated bacteriuria rather than true infection. Alternatives have been proposed, but CAUTI rates measured by this definition are currently required to be reported to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and high CAUTI rates can result in financial penalties. Although CAUTI may not directly result in significant patient harm, it has several indirect patient safety implications and CAUTI reduction has several benefits. Various bundles have been successful at reducing CAUTI both in individual institutions and on larger scales such as healthcare networks and entire states.

Summary: CAUTI reduction is possible in the ICU through a combination of reduced catheter usage, improved catheter care and stewardship of urine cultures.

Full reference: Sampathkumar, P. (2017) Reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the ICU. Current Opinion in Critical Care: Published online: 28 July 2017

Monitoring the hand hygiene compliance of health care workers

Brotfein, E. et al. American Journal of Infection Control | Published online: 4 May 2017

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Highlights:

  • CCTV is a new and reliable method for observation of hand hygiene.
  • CCTV methodology records a different performing hand hygiene compared to overt observation.
  • Covert observations using CCTV can replace direct overt observation for hand hygiene of HCWs.

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Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus between health-care workers, the environment, and patients in an intensive care unit

Price, J.R. et al. (2017) The Lancet Infectious Diseases. 17(2) pp. 207–214

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Background: Health-care workers have been implicated in nosocomial outbreaks of Staphylococcus aureus, but the dearth of evidence from non-outbreak situations means that routine health-care worker screening and S aureus eradication are controversial. We aimed to determine how often S aureus is transmitted from health-care workers or the environment to patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) and a high-dependency unit (HDU) where standard infection control measures were in place.

Interpretation: In the presence of standard infection control measures, health-care workers were infrequently sources of transmission to patients. S aureus epidemiology in the ICU and HDU is characterised by continuous ingress of distinct subtypes rather than transmission of genetically related strains.

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Hand Hygiene in Intensive Care Units: A Matter of Time?

Stahmeyer, J.T. The Journal of Hospital Infection. Published online: January 28, 2017

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Background: Healthcare-associated infections are a frequent threat to patient safety and cause significant disease burden. The most important single preventive measure is hand hygiene (HH). Barriers to adherence with HH recommendations include structural aspects, knowledge gaps, and organizational issues, especially a lack of time in daily routine.

Conclusion: Complying with guidelines is time consuming. Sufficient time for HH should be considered in staff planning.

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Prevention of Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections in a Pediatric ICU

Düzkaya, D.S. et al. (2016) Critical Care Nurse. 36(6) pp. e1-e7

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Background: Bloodstream infections related to use of catheters are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates, prolonged hospital lengths of stay, and increased medical costs.

Conclusions: Use of chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings reduced rates of catheter-related bloodstream infections, contamination, colonization, and local catheter infection in a pediatric intensive care unit but was not significantly better than use of standard dressings.

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Chlorhexidine bathing and health care-associated infections among adult intensive care patients

Frost, S.A. et al. Critical Care. Published online: 23 November 2016

 

L0075034 An intensive care unit in a hospital.

Image source: Robert Priseman – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Background: Health care-associated infections (HAI) have been shown to increase length of stay, the cost of care, and rates of hospital deaths . Importantly, infections acquired during a hospital stay have been shown to be preventable. In particular, due to more invasive procedures, mechanical ventilation, and critical illness, patients cared for in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at greater risk of HAI and associated poor outcomes.

Conclusion: This meta-analysis of the effectiveness of CHG bathing to reduce infections among adults in the ICU has found evidence for the benefit of daily bathing with CHG to reduce CLABSI and MRSA infections. However, the effectiveness may be dependent on the underlying baseline risk of these events among the given ICU population. Therefore, CHG bathing appears to be of the most clinical benefit when infection rates are high for a given ICU population.

Read the full abstract and article here