Preventing healthcare associated gram-negative bacterial bloodstream infections

An improvement resource to help health and social care economies reduce the number of gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSIs) with an initial focus on Escherichia coli (E.coli).

This resource pack makes suggestions rather than prescriptions about how to reduce these infections and pulls together a collection of tools for local teams. The authors recognise that effective prevention of infection is multifaceted and requires strong leadership, effective training programmes, and evidence-based guidelines and interventions.  biology-220005_1280

The report groups the resources under the following sections:

Reducing Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections

Reducing Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI’s) at a District General Hospital. Can change be sustained? | Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQINN) project. 

This shared-learning tool describes how Chesterfield Royal Hospital developed an improvement strategy to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections after data revealed rates were double the national average.

Full document: Six Step strategy for reducing cather associated urinary tract_infections

Improving the catheter associated UTI rate in an intensive care unit

Galiczewski, J.M. & Shurpin, K.M. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing. Published online: 22 February 2017

Background: Healthcare associated infections from indwelling urinary catheters lead to increased patient morbidity and mortality.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine if direct observation of the urinary catheter insertion procedure, as compared to the standard process, decreased catheter utilization and urinary tract infection rates.

Conclusion: The findings from this study may promote changes in clinical practice guidelines leading to a reduction in urinary catheter utilization and infection rates and improved patient outcomes.

Read the full abstract here

Collaboration with an infection control team for patients with infection after spine surgery

Kobayashi, K. et al. American Journal of Infection Control. Published online: 22 February 2017

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Highlights: 

  • The risk of infection after spine surgery has increased due to aging of society.
  • An infection control team (ICT) manages infected cases at our hospital.
  • The ICT guided use of antibiotics in 30 cases and investigated infection in 10.
  • The bacteria detection rate was 88% (35/40 patients) in cases treated by the ICT.
  • Early assistance from the ICT is a key to preventing onset of MRSA infection.

Read the full abstract here

Oral care in ventilated intensive care unit patients

Diaz, T.L. et al. American Journal of Infection Control. Published online: 23 January 2017

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Highlights:

  • A quality improvement project was developed to evaluate the pre/post effects of standardized placement and supply of oral care equipment in patient rooms.
  • Daily audits were performed to assess nursing behavior related to the performance of oral care on intubated patients with components from a 24 hour kit.
  • Increasing supply and creating uniform placement of oral care tools in patient rooms contributes to increased performance of oral hygiene interventions by nurses.

Read the full abstract here