UCLA Researchers Combat Antimicrobial Resistance Using Smartphones

A team of UCLA researchers has developed an automated diagnostic test reader for antimicrobial resistance using a smartphone | Infection Control Today

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The technology could lead to routine testing for antimicrobial susceptibility in areas with limited resources. Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are posing a severe threat to global public health. In particular, they are becoming more common in bacterial pathogens responsible for high-mortality diseases such as pneumonia, diarrhea and sepsis. Part of the challenge in combatting the spread of these organisms has been the limited ability to conduct antimicrobial susceptibility testing in regions that do not have access to labs, testing equipment and trained diagnostic technicians to read such tests.

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Smartphone text message service to foster hand hygiene compliance in health care workers

Kerbaj, J. et al. American Journal of Infection Control. Published online 9 December 2016

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Background: Health care-associated infections are a major worldwide public health issue. Hand hygiene is a major component in the prevention of pathogen transmission in hospitals, and hand hygiene adherence by health care workers is low in many studies. We report an intervention using text messages as reminders and feedback to improve hand hygiene adherence.

Conclusions: Text message feedback should be incorporated into multimodal approaches for improving hand hygiene compliance.

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Post-prescription antibiotic review based on computerized tools

Bouchand, F. et al. The Journal of Hospital Infection. Published online: November 25 2016

 

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Background: Controlling antibiotic use in healthcare establishments limits their consumption and the emergence of bacterial resistance.

Aim: We evaluated the efficiency of an innovative antibiotic-stewardship strategy implemented over 3 years in a university hospital.

 

Conclusion: This computerized, shared-access, antibiotic-stewardship strategy seems to be time-saving and effectively limited misuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

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Social media as a tool for antimicrobial stewardship

Pisano, J. et al (2016) American Journal of Infection Control44(11) pp. 1231–1236

Highlights

  • Medical trainees can be engaged through the use of social media.
  • Social media can be used to increase awareness and use of educational tools.
  • Clinical pathway use increased through increased awareness and periodic reminders.
  • Antibiotic knowledge increased as a result of following our program on social media.

Abstract

mobile-phone-1704781_960_720Background: To increase the reach of our antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP), social media platforms, Facebook and Twitter, were used to increase internal medicine residents’ (IMRs’) antibiotic (Abx) knowledge and awareness of ASP resources.

Methods: Fifty-five of 110 (50%) IMRs consented to participate; 39 (71%) completed both pre- and postintervention surveys and followed our ASP on social media. Along with 20 basic Abx and infectious diseases (IDs) questions, this survey assessed IMR awareness of ASP initiatives, social media usage, and attitudes and beliefs surrounding Abx resistance. Over 6 months, IMRs received posts and Tweets of basic Abx/IDs trivia while promoting use of educational tools and clinical pathways on our ASP Web site. To compare pre- and postsurvey responses, McNemar test or Stuart-Maxwell test was used for categorical variables, and paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for continuous variables, as appropriate.

Results: Of the IMRs, 98% and 58% use Facebook and Twitter, respectively. To compare pre- and postintervention, median scores for Abx knowledge increased from 12 (interquartile range, 8-13) to 13 (interquartile range, 11-15; P = .048); IMRs knowing how to access the ASP Web site increased from 70% to 94%. More IMRs indicated that they used the clinical pathways “sometimes, frequently, or always” after the intervention (33% vs 61%, P = .004).

Conclusions: Social media is a valuable tool to reinforce ASP initiatives while encouraging the use of ASP resources to promote antimicrobial mindfulness.

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