Improving the catheter associated UTI rate in an intensive care unit

Galiczewski, J.M. & Shurpin, K.M. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing. Published online: 22 February 2017

Background: Healthcare associated infections from indwelling urinary catheters lead to increased patient morbidity and mortality.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine if direct observation of the urinary catheter insertion procedure, as compared to the standard process, decreased catheter utilization and urinary tract infection rates.

Conclusion: The findings from this study may promote changes in clinical practice guidelines leading to a reduction in urinary catheter utilization and infection rates and improved patient outcomes.

Read the full abstract here

Eight Years of Decreased MRSA Infections Associated With Veterans Affairs Prevention Initiative

Evans, M.E. et al. American Journal of Infection Control. 45(1) pp. 13-16

graph-1302826_960_720.jpg

Background: Declines in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) health care associated infections (HAIs) were previously reported in Veterans Affairs acute care (2012), spinal cord injury (SCIU) (2011), and long-term-care facilities (LTCFs) (2012). Here we report continuing declines in infection rates in these settings through September 2015.

Conclusions: MRSA HAI rates declined significantly in acute care, SCIUs, and LTCFs over 8 years of the Veterans Affairs MRSA Prevention Initiative.

Read the full article here

The burden of healthcare associated Clostridium difficile infection in a non-metropolitan setting

Bond, S.E. et al. The Journal of Hospital Infections. Published online: December 18 2016

Objective: Healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection (HCA-CDI) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialised countries. However, few data exist on the burden of HCA-CDI in multisite non-metropolitan settings. This study examined the introduction of an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) in relation to HCA-CDI rates and the effect of HCA-CDI on length of stay (LOS) and hospital costs.

 

Conclusions: HCA-CDI placed a significant burden on our regional and rural health service through increased LOS and hospital costs. Interventions targeting HCA-CDI could be employed to consolidate the effects of ASPs.

Read the full abstract here

Smartphone text message service to foster hand hygiene compliance in health care workers

Kerbaj, J. et al. American Journal of Infection Control. Published online 9 December 2016

keyboard-1792310_960_720.png

Background: Health care-associated infections are a major worldwide public health issue. Hand hygiene is a major component in the prevention of pathogen transmission in hospitals, and hand hygiene adherence by health care workers is low in many studies. We report an intervention using text messages as reminders and feedback to improve hand hygiene adherence.

Conclusions: Text message feedback should be incorporated into multimodal approaches for improving hand hygiene compliance.

Read the full abstract here

The lowbury lecture 2016: can intersectional innovations reduce hospital infection?

Saint, S. The Journal of Hospital Infection. Published online: November 28, 2016

classroom-1699745_960_720

Preventing healthcare-associated infection remains an international priority given the clinical and economic consequences of this largely preventable patient safety harm. While important strides have been made in preventing hospital infections over the past several decades, thorny issues remain, including how to consistently improve hand hygiene rates and further reduce device-related complications such as catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

Rather than relying solely on directional innovations – incremental changes that continue to serve as the bedrock of scientific advancement – perhaps we should also search for “intersectional innovations,” which represent breakthrough discoveries that emanate from the intersection of often widely divergent disciplines. Several intersectional innovations that have the potential to greatly impact infection prevention efforts include human factors engineering, sociology, and engaging the senses. Indeed, Professor Edward Joseph Lister Lowbury, the namesake of this lecture, exemplified intersectional thinking in his own life having been both an accomplished bacteriologist and poet. By incorporating approaches outside of traditional biomedical science we will hopefully provide patients with the safe care they expect and deserve.

Read the full article here

Chlorhexidine bathing and health care-associated infections among adult intensive care patients

Frost, S.A. et al. Critical Care. Published online: 23 November 2016

 

L0075034 An intensive care unit in a hospital.

Image source: Robert Priseman – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Background: Health care-associated infections (HAI) have been shown to increase length of stay, the cost of care, and rates of hospital deaths . Importantly, infections acquired during a hospital stay have been shown to be preventable. In particular, due to more invasive procedures, mechanical ventilation, and critical illness, patients cared for in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at greater risk of HAI and associated poor outcomes.

Conclusion: This meta-analysis of the effectiveness of CHG bathing to reduce infections among adults in the ICU has found evidence for the benefit of daily bathing with CHG to reduce CLABSI and MRSA infections. However, the effectiveness may be dependent on the underlying baseline risk of these events among the given ICU population. Therefore, CHG bathing appears to be of the most clinical benefit when infection rates are high for a given ICU population.

Read the full abstract and article here

Reducing infections in the NHS

Department of Health | Published online: 10 November 2016

http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/result.html?_IXMAXHITS_=1&_IXACTION_=query&_IXFIRST_=26&_IXSR_=Y1PTh2TptHP&_IXSS_=_IXFPFX_%3dtemplates%252ft%26_IXMAXHITS_%3d250%26c%3d%2522historical%2bimages%2522%2bOR%2b%2522contemporary%2bimages%2522%2bOR%2b%2522corporate%2bimages%2522%2bOR%2b%2522contemporary%2bclinical%2bimages%2522%26_IXFIRST_%3d1%26%252asform%3dwellcome%252dimages%26%2524%2b%2528%2528with%2bwi_sfgu%2bis%2bY%2529%2band%2bnot%2b%2528%2522contemporary%2bclinical%2bimages%2522%2bindex%2bwi_collection%2bor%2b%2522corporate%2bimages%2522%2bindex%2bwi_collection%2529%2529%2band%2bnot%2bwith%2bsys_deleted%3d%252e%26%2524%253dsi%3dtext%26_IXACTION_%3dquery%26%3d%26_IXrescount%3d108%26_IXINITSR_%3dy%26%2524%253dsort%3dsort%2bsortexpr%2bimage_sort%26_IXshc%3dy%26%2524%253ds%3de%2bcoli&_IXSPFX_=templates%2ft&_IXFPFX_=templates%2ft

Image source: David Gregory & Debbie Marshall – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Image shows electron micrograph of Escherichia coli close-up

Plans to prevent hospital infections include more money for hospitals who reduce infection rates and publishing E. coli rates by local area.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has launched new plans to reduce infections in the NHS. He announced government plans to halve the number of gram-negative bloodstream infections by 2020 at an infection control summit.

E. coli infections – which represent 65% of what are called gram-negative infections – killed more than 5,500 NHS patients last year and are set to cost the NHS £2.3 billion by 2018. There is also large variation in hospital infection rates, with the worst performers having more than 5 times the number of cases than the best performing hospitals.

Infection rates can be cut with better hygiene and improved patient care in hospitals, surgeries and care homes, such as ensuring staff, patients and visitors regularly wash their hands. People using insertion devices such as catheters, which are often used following surgery, can develop infections like E. coli if they are not inserted properly, left in too long or if patients are not properly hydrated and going to the toilet regularly.

Read the full news story here