Hepatitis A infection: prevention and control guidance

Guidance to help public health professionals manage hepatitis A infections and recommendations for pre-exposure immunisation.

This guidance has been developed to aid the public health management of hepatitis A infection which aims to reduce the occurrence of secondary infections and to prevent and control outbreaks.

The guidance has been developed based on a review of the current epidemiology of hepatitis A in England and Wales and a review of the literature on the efficacy of human normal immunoglobulin (HNIG) and hepatitis A vaccine for post-exposure prophylaxis. This guidance updates the 2009 Guidance for the Prevention and Control of Hepatitis A Infection.

Managing common infections: guidance for primary care

Public Health England has updated Managing common infections: guidance for consultation and local adaptation.

This guidance is to help GPs and heath care staff treat infections and use antibiotics responsibly.  This update includes significant changes to the urinary tract infection section, associated references and rationale.

NICE guideline update – Surgical site infections: prevention and treatment

Surveillance report 2017 – Surgical site infections: prevention and treatment (2008) | NICE guideline CG74

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Surveillance decision: We will plan an update of the guideline on prevention and treatment of surgical site infections. The update will focus on:

  • nasal decontamination of Staphylococcus aureus
  • choice of preoperative skin antiseptics
  • application of intraoperative topical antiseptics/antimicrobials before wound closure
  • type of suture.

We will consider intraoperative perfusion and hydration, and intraoperative blood glucose control in a new guideline on perioperative care. Recommendations in the surgical site infection guideline will be withdrawn on publication of new recommendations in the perioperative care guideline.

Read the full update here

Global guidelines on the prevention of surgical site infection

WHO | Published online: November 2016

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Image source: WHO

Health care-associated infections (HAI) are acquired by patients while receiving care and represent the most frequent adverse event affecting patient safety worldwide.

Recent work by the World Health Organization (WHO) shows that surgical site infection (SSI) is the most surveyed and frequent type of HAI in low- and middle-income countries and affects up to one third of patients who have undergone a surgical procedure. Although SSI incidence is lower in high-income countries, it remains the second most frequent type of HAI in Europe and the United States of America (USA).

Many factors in the patient’s journey through surgery have been identified as contributing to the risk of SSI. Therefore, the prevention of these infections is complex and requires the integration of a range of preventive measures before, during and after surgery. However, the implementation of these measures is not standardized worldwide. No international guidelines are currently available and inconsistency in the interpretation of evidence and recommendations among national guidelines is frequently identified.

Read the overview here

Read the full report here

NICE guidance: sepsis

B0006171 Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A1

Image shows Streptococcus pyogenes. This is a bacterial superantigen capable of causing toxic shock. Source: K R Acharya, Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

NICE has published new guidance Sepsis: recognition, diagnosis and early management (NG51). This guideline covers the recognition, diagnosis and early management of sepsis for all populations. The guideline committee identified that the key issues to be included were: recognition and early assessment, diagnostic and prognostic value of blood markers for sepsis, initial treatment, escalating care, identifying the source of infection, early monitoring, information and support for patients and carers, and training and education.

The UK Sepsis Trust will support release of the NICE Clinical Guideline on sepsis with tools and resources including screening and action tools to aid with early identification and management of sepsis in children and adults (including in pregnancy) across community-based, prehospital and acute clinical environments.

Related: NICE pathway: Sepsis

Respiratory tract infections: infection control

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Public Health England has published Infection control precautions to minimise transmission of acute respiratory tract infections in healthcare settings.  This document summarises recommendations for the prevention and control of acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings for clinical and public health colleagues.  The guidance explores transmission routes, hygiene and the use of personal protective equipment.  It replaces the HPA Version 1 guidance document of the same name, which was reviewed and updated in December 2014.