Dressings for the prevention of surgical site infection

Dumville, J.C et al. (2016) Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews . Issue 12. Art. No.: CD00309

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Image source: Cochrane

Background: Surgical wounds (incisions) heal by primary intention when the wound edges are brought together and secured, often with sutures, staples, or clips. Wound dressings applied after wound closure may provide physical support, protection and absorb exudate. There are many different types of wound dressings available and wounds can also be left uncovered (exposed). Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication of wounds and this may be associated with using (or not using) dressings, or different types of dressing.

Authors’ conclusions: It is uncertain whether covering surgical wounds healing by primary intention with wound dressings reduces the risk of SSI, or whether any particular wound dressing is more effective than others in reducing the risk of SSI, improving scarring, reducing pain, improving acceptability to patients, or is easier to remove. Most studies in this review were small and at a high or unclear risk of bias. Based on the current evidence, decision makers may wish to base decisions about how to dress a wound following surgery on dressing costs as well as patient preference.

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Prevention of Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections in a Pediatric ICU

Düzkaya, D.S. et al. (2016) Critical Care Nurse. 36(6) pp. e1-e7

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Background: Bloodstream infections related to use of catheters are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates, prolonged hospital lengths of stay, and increased medical costs.

Conclusions: Use of chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings reduced rates of catheter-related bloodstream infections, contamination, colonization, and local catheter infection in a pediatric intensive care unit but was not significantly better than use of standard dressings.

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Clinical experiences of using Biopatch: a chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated sponge dressing. Case study 3: paediatric care.

The article presents an interview with British nurse Jonathan Whitton of Nottingham Children’s Hospital. When asked about his experience of using a chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) impregnated sponge dressing, Whitton says that he found it easy to apply and remove. He comments on the role infection prevention plays in his daily nursing activities. Whitton believes that all pediatric units should review the available literature about CHG dressings.

Clinical experiences of using Biopatch: a chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated sponge dressing. Case study 3: paediatric care. Whitton J. Br J Nurs. 2014, vol 23 (14 Suppl):S22.

Clinical experiences of using Biopatch: a chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated sponge dressing. Case study 2: paediatric intensive care.

The article presents an interview with nurse Norman Franklin of Freeman Hospital in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. When asked what made him decide to use a chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) impregnated sponge dressing, he says the decision followed the publication of research on the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections. He comments on the role that infection prevention plays in his daily nursing activities. Franklin believes that using CHG sponge dressings will benefit patients.

Clinical experiences of using Biopatch: a chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated sponge dressing. Case study 2: paediatric intensive care. Franklin N. Br J Nurs. 2014, vol 23(14 Suppl):S21.

Clinical experiences of using Biopatch: a chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated sponge dressing. Case study 1: renal setting.

The article presents an interview with Mark Nicholls of East Kent Hospitals University National Health Service Foundation Trust in Kent, England. When asked what made him decide to use a chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) impregnated sponge dressing in his workplace, Nicholls says that it was an audit of his facility. He comments on the role that infection prevention plays in his daily nursing activities. Nicholls believes that the use of CHG sponge dressings benefits patients.

Clinical experiences of using Biopatch: a chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated sponge dressing. Case study 1: renal setting. Nicholls M. Br J Nurs. 2014, vol 23(14 Suppl):S20-1