Risk of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection in Neonates

Umbilical venous catheters (UVC) or peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC), commonly used in high risk neonates, may have a threshold dwell time for subsequent increased risk of central line associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) | The Journal of Hospital Infection

Aim: To evaluate the CLABSI risks in neonates having either UVC, PICC or those having both sequentially.

Methods: Study included 3985 infants who had UVC or PICC inserted between 2007 and 2009 cared for in 10 regional Neonatal Intensive Care Units: 1392 having UVC only (Group 1), 1317 PICC only (Group 2) and 1276 both UVC and PICC (Group 3).

Results: There were 403 CLABSI among 6000 venous catheters inserted, totalling 43302 catheter days. CLABSI rates were higher in Group 3 infants who were of lowest gestation (16.9/1000 UVC days and 12.5/1000 PICC days; median 28 weeks) when compared with Group 1 (3.3/1000 UVC days; 37 weeks) and Group 2 (4.8/1000 PICC days; 30 weeks). Life table and Kaplan-Meier hazard analysis showed UVC CLABSI rate increased stepwise to 42/1000 UVC days by day 10, with the highest rate in Group 3 (85/1000 UVC days). PICC CLABSI rates remained relatively stable at 12-20/1000 PICC days. Compared to PICC, UVC had a higher adjusted CLABSI risk controlled for dwell time. Among Group 3, replacing UVC electively before day 4 may have a trend of lower CLABSI risk, than late replacement.

Conclusions: There was no cut-off duration beyond which PICC should be removed electively. Early UVC removal and replacement by PICC before day 4 could be considered.

Full reference: Sanderson, E. et al. (2017) Dwell Time and Risk of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection in Neonates. The Journal of Hospital Infection. Published online: 24 June 2017

Reducing Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections

Reducing Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI’s) at a District General Hospital. Can change be sustained? | Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQINN) project. 

This shared-learning tool describes how Chesterfield Royal Hospital developed an improvement strategy to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections after data revealed rates were double the national average.

Full document: Six Step strategy for reducing cather associated urinary tract_infections

The value of direct observation to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infection

Afonso, E. & Blot, S. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing | Published online: 26 April 2017

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Urinary tract catheterization and monitoring of the urinary output is indispensable in critically ill patients as might indicate intravascular circulating volume, organ perfusion, and pending shock (Paratz et al., 2014; Eastwood et al., 2015). The presence of a urinary catheter however involves the risk of infection.

We read with interest the article by Galiczewski and Shurpin (2017) about the efficiency of direct observation to reduce bladder catheter utilization and catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the ICU.

Read the comment article here

Read the original research article here

Improving the catheter associated UTI rate in an intensive care unit

Galiczewski, J.M. & Shurpin, K.M. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing. Published online: 22 February 2017

Background: Healthcare associated infections from indwelling urinary catheters lead to increased patient morbidity and mortality.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine if direct observation of the urinary catheter insertion procedure, as compared to the standard process, decreased catheter utilization and urinary tract infection rates.

Conclusion: The findings from this study may promote changes in clinical practice guidelines leading to a reduction in urinary catheter utilization and infection rates and improved patient outcomes.

Read the full abstract here

Prevention of Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections in a Pediatric ICU

Düzkaya, D.S. et al. (2016) Critical Care Nurse. 36(6) pp. e1-e7

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Background: Bloodstream infections related to use of catheters are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates, prolonged hospital lengths of stay, and increased medical costs.

Conclusions: Use of chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings reduced rates of catheter-related bloodstream infections, contamination, colonization, and local catheter infection in a pediatric intensive care unit but was not significantly better than use of standard dressings.

Read the full abstract here

Reducing infections in the NHS

Plans to prevent hospital infections include more money for hospitals who reduce infection rates and publishing E. coli rates by local area.

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New plans to reduce infections in the NHS have been announced by the government at an infection control summit. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt announced the plan to halve the number of gram-negative bloodstream infections by 2020.

Infection rates can be cut with better hygiene and improved patient care in hospitals, surgeries and care homes, such as ensuring staff, patients and visitors regularly wash their hands. People using insertion devices such as catheters, which are often used following surgery, can develop infections like E. coli if they are not inserted properly, left in too long or if patients are not properly hydrated and going to the toilet regularly.

These new plans build on the progress made in infection control since 2010 – the number of MRSA cases has been reduced by 57% and C. difficile by 45%.

Read more via Department of Health

Effect of Chlorhexidine Bathing Every Other Day on Prevention of Hospital-Acquired Infections in the Surgical ICU

Swan, J.T. et al. (2016) Critical Care Medicine. 44(10) pp. 1822–1832

rubber-duck-1390639_960_720Objective: To test the hypothesis that compared with daily soap and water bathing, 2% chlorhexidine gluconate bathing every other day for up to 28 days decreases the risk of hospital-acquired catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, incisional surgical site infection, and primary bloodstream infection in surgical ICU patients.

Design: This was a single-center, pragmatic, randomized trial. Patients and clinicians were aware of treatment-group assignment; investigators who determined outcomes were blinded.

Setting: Twenty-four–bed surgical ICU at a quaternary academic medical center.

Patients: Adults admitted to the surgical ICU from July 2012 to May 2013 with an anticipated surgical ICU stay for 48 hours or more were included.

Interventions: Patients were randomized to bathing with 2% chlorhexidine every other day alternating with soap and water every other day (treatment arm) or to bathing with soap and water daily (control arm).

Measurements and Main Results: The primary endpoint was a composite outcome of catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, incisional surgical site infection, and primary bloodstream infection. Of 350 patients randomized, 24 were excluded due to prior enrollment in this trial and one withdrew consent. Therefore, 325 were analyzed (164 soap and water versus 161 chlorhexidine). Patients acquired 53 infections. Compared with soap and water bathing, chlorhexidine bathing every other day decreased the risk of acquiring infections (hazard ratio = 0.555; 95% CI, 0.309–0.997; p = 0.049). For patients bathed with soap and water versus chlorhexidine, counts of incident hospital-acquired infections were 14 versus 7 for catheter-associated urinary tract infection, 13 versus 8 for ventilator-associated pneumonia, 6 versus 3 for incisional surgical site infections, and 2 versus 0 for primary bloodstream infection; the effect was consistent across all infections. The absolute risk reduction for acquiring a hospital-acquired infection was 9.0% (95% CI, 1.5–16.4%; p = 0.019). Incidences of adverse skin occurrences were similar (18.9% soap and water vs 18.6% chlorhexidine; p = 0.95).

Conclusions: Compared with soap and water, chlorhexidine bathing every other day decreased the risk of acquiring infections by 44.5% in surgical ICU patients.