Reduction in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation: impact of a screening and decolonisation programme

Garvey, M.I. et al. Journal of Infection Prevention. Published online: 4 August 2016

https://www.flickr.com/photos/wellcomeimages/16003100451/in/photolist-qo95e2-fCw4hb-53wmHs-58CKUe-cw4Wfq-cw4UMo-cw4WL3-cw4VJU-7ojVRv-4CaQEw-4C6xeT-EU6nC-4CaQLJ-q6Lo13-qoj7iX-4CaQDu-EU4Nk-zpiJyu-4CaQMY-qm32Db-j4vREz-or2Sbx-oHuHUf-j4MspC-9y4sDM-or32x7-dQjFSx-a4RLq5-6JBQwo-bpzxT4-iQPVjT-oHuBLJ-or2TEV-oY1BkX-bpCfQR-fN98g7-4CaQCA-4C6xnp-4C6xoc-4C6xmt-4C6xji-fzTQ3p-9RQsFL-7uoVdt-4bAWxg-oHfG5k-DEvM97-9y7kCs-9TwwGL-9TwvXh

Image source: Annie Cavanagh – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Patients in care homes are often at ‘high risk’ of being methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonised. Here we report the prevalence of MRSA, the effect of MRSA screening and decolonisation in Wolverhampton care-home residents.

Eighty-two care homes (1665 residents) were screened for MRSA, three times at 6-monthly intervals (referred to as phases one, two and three). Screening and decolonisation of MRSA-colonised residents led to a reduction in the prevalence of MRSA from 8.7% in phase one, 6.3% in phase 2 and 4.7% in phase three.

Overall, the study suggests that care-home facilities in Wolverhampton are a significant reservoir for MRSA; screening and decolonisation has reduced the risk to residents going for procedures and has indirectly impacted on MRSA rates in the acute Trust.

Read the abstract here

 

Perceived barriers to infection prevention and control for nursing home certified nursing assistants: A qualitative study

Geriatric Nursing: Volume 36, Issue 5, September–October 2015, Pages 355–360

Abstract
Healthcare-associated infections, while preventable, result in increased morbidity and mortality in nursing home (NH) residents. Frontline personnel, such as certified nursing assistants (CNAs), are crucial to successful implementation of infection prevention and control (IPC) practices.

The purpose of this study was to explore barriers to implementing and maintaining IPC practices for NH CNAs as well as to describe strategies used to overcome these barriers. We conducted a multi-site qualitative study of NH personnel important to infection control. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and transcripts were analyzed using conventional content analysis.

Five key themes emerged as perceived barriers to effective IPC for CNAs:

1) language/culture;

2) knowledge/training;

3) per-diem/part-time staff;

4) workload;

5) accountability.

Strategies used to overcome these barriers included: translating in-services, hands on training, on-the-spot training for per-diem/part-time staff, increased staffing ratios, and inclusion/empowerment of CNAs. Understanding IPC barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers may better enable NHs to achieve infection reduction goals.

via Perceived barriers to infection prevention and control for nursing home certified nursing assistants: A qualitative study.

Infection prevention and control in nursing homes: a qualitative study of decision-making regarding isolation-based practices

BMJ Qual Saf 2015;24:630-636

Background Isolation-based practices in nursing homes (NHs) differ from those in acute care. NHs must promote quality of life while preventing infection transmission. Practices used in NHs to reconcile these goals of care have not been characterised.

Purpose To explore decision-making in isolation-based infection prevention and control practices in NHs.

Methods A qualitative study was conducted with staff (eg, staff nurses, infection prevention directors and directors of nursing) employed in purposefully sampled US NHs. Semistructured, role-specific interview guides were developed and interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using directed content analysis. The research team discussed emerging themes in weekly meetings to confirm consensus.

Results We inferred from 73 interviews in 10 NHs that there was variation between NHs in practices regarding who was isolated, when isolation-based practices took place, how they were implemented, and how they were tailored for each resident. Interviewees’ decision-making depended on staff perceptions of acceptable transmission risk and resident quality of life. NH resources also influenced decision-making, including availability of private rooms, extent to which staff can devote time to isolation-based practices and communication tools. A lack of understanding of key infection prevention and control concepts was also revealed.

Conclusions and implications Current clinical guidelines are not specific enough to ensure consistent practice that meets care goals and resource constraints in NHs. However, new epidemiological research regarding effectiveness of varying isolation practices in this setting is needed to inform clinical practice. Further, additional infection prevention and control education for NH staff may be required.

via Infection prevention and control in nursing homes: a qualitative study of decision-making regarding isolation-based practices — Cohen et al. 24 (10): 630 — BMJ Quality and Safety.

Understanding infection prevention and control in nursing homes: A qualitative study – Geriatric Nursing

July–August, 2015Volume 36, Issue 4, Pages 267–272

Abstract

Infections have been identified as a priority issue in nursing homes (NHs). We conducted a qualitative study purposively sampling 10 NHs across the country where 6–8 employees were recruited (N = 73).

Semi-structured, open-ended guides were used to conduct in-depth interviews. Data were audiotaped, transcribed and a content analysis was performed.

Five themes emerged: ‘Residents’ Needs’, ‘Roles and Training’ ‘Using Infection Data,’ ‘External Resources’ and ‘Focus on Hand Hygiene.’ I

nfection prevention was a priority in the NHs visited. While all sites had hand hygiene programs, other recommended areas were not a focus and many sites were not aware of available resources. Developing ways to ensure effective, efficient and standardized infection prevention and control in NHs continues to be a national priority.

via Understanding infection prevention and control in nursing homes: A qualitative study – Geriatric Nursing.