Progress report on the UK 5 year antimicrobial resistance strategy

The third annual progress report on the UK 5 year antimicrobial resistance (AMR) strategy, including future plans | Department of Health

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The third annual progress report describes the activities and achievements in the third year of implementation of the UK 5 year antimicrobial resistance (AMR) strategy 2013 to 2018, including significant international achievements.

The UK AMR strategy represents an ambitious programme to slow the development and spread of AMR, taking a ‘One Health’ approach spanning people, animals, agriculture and the wider environment.

The report sets out progress made in 2016, and notes that for the remaining 2 years of the strategy, the programme will focus on delivery of the government’s ambitions set out in response to the review on AMR led by Lord O’Neill. These include ambitions to halve certain types of infection and the inappropriate use of antibiotics.

Full report: UK 5 Year Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Strategy 2013-2018. Annual progress report, 2016

 

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Antibiotic awareness resources

Public Health England have published a series of antibiotic awareness resources to support the Antibiotic Guardian campaign and local initiatives.

Antibiotic awareness: toolkit for healthcare professionals in England
Guidance to help the NHS, local authorities and others support European Antibiotic Awareness Day and the Antibiotic Guardian campaign, to encourage responsible use of antibiotics.

Antibiotic awareness: quizzes and crosswords
Quizzes and crosswords about antibiotic resistance for the public, healthcare prescribers and pharmacists.

Antibiotics: secondary care prescriber’s checklist
Prescribers in secondary healthcare can use this checklist to help make decisions about prescribing antibiotics.

Antibiotic awareness: posters and leaflets
Posters and leaflets (in 11 languages) for the public and healthcare professionals to support antibiotic awareness campaigns in the UK.

PHE have also produced a short video to help explain the issue of antibiotic resistance:

Impact of antibiotic therapy in severe community-acquired pneumonia:

Antibiotic therapy (AT) is the cornerstone of the management of severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, the best treatment strategy is far from being established | Journal of Critical Care

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Highlights:

  • In SCAP patients, the use of combination of antibiotics that includes a macrolide is associated a better hospital and long term (6 months) survival.
  • Courses of antibiotic therapy longer than 7 days are not associated with survival benefit but lead to longer ICU and hospital LOS.
  • Serum lactate showed to be a good prognostic marker of hospital mortality in SCAP patients.

Full reference: Pereira, J.M. et al. (2017) Impact of antibiotic therapy in severe community-acquired pneumonia: Data from the Infauci study. Journal of Critical Care. Published online: 4 September 2017

Scientists stumble across new method of making antibiotics

Cancer researchers may have stumbled across a solution to reverse antibiotic drug resistance and stop infections like MRSA. | Via ScienceDaily

Experts warn we are decades behind in the race against superbugs having already exploited naturally occurring antibiotics, with the creation of new ones requiring time, money and ingenuity.

But a team of scientists at the University of Salford say they may have found a very simple way forward — even though they weren’t even looking for antibiotics.

And they have created and validated several new antibiotics already — many of which are as potent, or more so, than standard antibiotics, such as amoxicillin.

“A little like Alexander Fleming, we weren’t even looking for antibiotics rather researching into new compounds that might be effective against cancer stem cells,” explains Michael P. Lisanti, Chair of Translational Medicine at the University’s Biomedical Research Centre.

“I think we’ve accidentally invented a systemic way of creating new antibiotics which is simple, cheap and could be very significant in the fight against superbugs,” added Dr Federica Sotgia, a co-author on the study.

Full story at ScienceDaily

Full reference:  Bela Ozsvari et al.  Mitoriboscins: Mitochondrial-based therapeutics targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs), bacteria and pathogenic yeast | Oncotarget, Advance Publications | published online July 7th 2017

Reducing antibiotic prescribing for children presenting to primary care with acute respiratory tract infection

Blair, P.S. et al. (2017) BMJ Open. 7:e014506

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Objective: To investigate recruitment and retention, data collection methods and the acceptability of a ‘within-consultation’ complex intervention designed to reduce antibiotic prescribing.

Conclusion: Differential recruitment may explain the paradoxical antibiotic prescribing rates. Future cluster level studies should consider designs which remove the need for individual consent postrandomisation and embed the intervention within electronic primary care records.

Read the full article here

Giving immediate antibiotics reduces deaths from sepsis

Giving immediate antibiotics (defined as within one hour) when people present to emergency departments with suspected sepsis reduces their risk of dying by a third compared with later administration. 

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This meta-analysis of observational data from 23,596 people in emergency department settings confirmed that giving antibiotics within one hour was linked to a lower risk of in-hospital mortality compared with giving antibiotics later.

This adds weight to recommendations from NICE and other organisations that antibiotics should be administered straight away in people with suspected sepsis. However, in practice up to a third of people in the UK do not receive antibiotics within the hour.

NHS England and the UK Sepsis Trust have recently launched a campaign to encourage all healthcare professionals to act quickly when they recognise sepsis.

Full reference: Johnston AN, Park J, Doi SA, et al. Effect of immediate administration of antibiotics in patients with sepsis in tertiary care: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Clinical Therapeutics.  2017;39(1):190-202.e6.

Managing common infections: guidance for primary care

Public Health England has updated Managing common infections: guidance for consultation and local adaptation.

This guidance is to help GPs and heath care staff treat infections and use antibiotics responsibly.  This update includes significant changes to the urinary tract infection section, associated references and rationale.