WHO Report: No Time to Wait- Securing the future from drug-resistant infections

World Health Organization | May 2019 | No Time to Wait: Securing the future from drug-resistant infections

A new report from WHO- No Time to Wait: Securing the future from drug-resistant infections– makes recommendations for urgent action in the global response to antimicrobial resistance.

No Time to Wait: Securing the future from drug-resistant infections

Membrane charge and lipid packing determine polymyxin-induced membrane damage

Khondker, A. et al | 2019 | Membrane charge and lipid packing determine polymyxin-induced membrane damage | Communications Biology |10.1038/s42003-019-0297-6.

A paper published in the journal Communications Biology indicates that bacteria- as they become resistant to antibiotics- are able to produce stronger cell walls  which enables them to repel antibiotics and prevents effective treatment.

With the advent of polymyxin B (PmB) resistance in bacteria, the mechanisms for mcr-1 resistance are of crucial importance in the design of novel therapeutics. The mcr-1 phenotype is known to decrease membrane charge and increase membrane packing by modification of the bacterial outer membrane. We used X-ray diffraction, Molecular Dynamics simulations, electrochemistry, and leakage assays to determine the location of PmB in different membranes and assess membrane damage. By varying membrane charge and lipid tail packing independently, we show that increasing membrane surface charge promotes penetration of PmB and membrane damage, whereas increasing lipid packing decreases penetration and damage. The penetration of the PmB molecules is well described by a phenomenological model that relates an attractive electrostatic and a repulsive force opposing insertion due to increased membrane packing. The model applies well to several gram-negative bacterial strains and may be used to predict resistance strength (Source: Khondker et al).

Membrane charge and lipid packing determine polymyxin-induced membrane damage

In the news:

The Telegraph Bacteria develop tougher membranes to resist antibiotics, report into superbugs finds

Resevoirs of antimicrobial resistance

Houses of Parliament Parliamentary Office of Science & Technology | February 2019 | Resevoirs of antimicrobial resistance

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a natural phenomenon but the spread of antimicrobial resistance is exacerbated by the widespread, and sometimes
inappropriate, use of antimicrobials in both human and veterinary medicine.

A new POSTnote from the Houses of Parliament Parliamentary Office of Science & Technology covers:

  • the spread of AMR in humans and animals;
  • the main reservoirs of AMR;
  • data for AMR in both humans and animals; and
  • future UK priorities in this area.

Resevoirs of antimicrobial resistance

UK 5-year action plan for antimicrobial resistance 2019 to 2024

Department of Health and Social Care | January 2019 | UK 5-year action plan for antimicrobial resistance 2019 to 2024

Ambitions and actions for the next 5 years, supporting the 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

This 5-year national action plan supports the UK 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance.

Related:

UK 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance

UK-China partnerships against antimicrobial resistance get funding

UK-China partnerships against antimicrobial resistance get funding

Department of Health and Social Care, Innovate UK & UK Research and Innovation| January 2019 | UK-China partnerships against antimicrobial resistance get funding

The UK’s innovation agency, Innovate UK has just announced the winners of two research competitions to address the issue of infections resistant to antibiotics both in humans and in animals.

On behalf of the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC), Innovate UK has completed two research competitions that will award £20 million of research funding for AMR research. This includes a bilateral research competition between DHSC’s Global AMR Innovation Fund  (GAMRIF) and the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), and a competition as part of the Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI).

Funding announced today demonstrates co-operation between UK and China to address the issue of antibiotic resistance.

The full news release can be read at Department of Health and Social Care 

Related: Funding opportunity available to UK and Chinese researchers to help tackle antimicrobial resistance (AMR)

UK 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance

Department of Health and Social Care | January 2019 | UK 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance

This policy paper outlines how the UK will contribute to containing and controlling antimicrobial resistance (AMR) by 2040.

The vision and plan were developed across the government, its agencies and administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, with support from a range of stakeholders (Source: Department of Health and Social Care).

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR)

Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs, Department of Health and Social Care, Public Health England, and Veterinary Medicines Directorate | December 2018 |Antimicrobial resistance (AMR)

The Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs, Department of Health and Social Care, Public Health England, and Veterinary Medicines Directorate  have updated  information and resources on the government’s plans to slow the growth of antimicrobial resistance.

Full details here