Reducing the impact of serious infections CQUIN

Resources to support delivery of the ‘Reducing the impact of serious infections (antimicrobial resistance and sepsis)’ CQUIN, parts 2c and 2d | NHS Improvement

  • Reducing the impact of serious infections CQUIN, parts 2c and 2d – questions and answersPDF, 185.4 KB – Questions and answers relating to parts 2c and 2d of the ‘Reducing the impact of serious infections’ CQUIN.
  • Part 2c data collection and submissionXLSX, 236.1 KB – PHE has developed this submission tool (and sample data collection form) to facilitate the submission of part 2c (antibiotic review). All data submitted will be available on AMR Fingertips.
  • Part 2d antibiotic consumption submission toolXLSM, 91.4 KB – The data submitted as part of this year’s antimicrobial resistance (AMR) CQUIN has been used to develop this baseline data. Providers that did not take part in the 2016/17 AMR CQUIN or submitted previous annual data should submit quarterly data from January to December 2016, using the antibiotic consumption spreadsheets available on the NHS England AMR CQUIN webpage. Without this data a baseline cannot be calculated for your provider.
  • Part 2d baseline dataXLS, 259.5 KB – Use this to submit quarterly antibiotic consumption data to PHE. All data once submitted will be available via AMR Fingertips after an eight week data cleaning period.
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Risk Factors for Community-Associated Clostridium difficile Infection in Children

Adams, D.J. et al. The Journal of Pediatrics | Published online: 7 April 2017

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Objective: To characterize the medication and other exposures associated with pediatric community-associated Clostridium difficile infections (CA-CDIs).

Conclusions: CA-CDI is associated with medications regularly prescribed in pediatric practice, along with exposure to outpatient healthcare clinics and family members with CDI. Our findings provide additional support for the judicious use of these medications and for efforts to limit spread of CDI in ambulatory healthcare settings and households.

Read the full abstract here