Antimicrobial resistance: 2019/20 improvement schemes

Joint NHS England and NHS Improvement Medical Director Professor Stephen Powis has written to CCG Directors of Quality, Nursing and Medicines Optimisation about two new antimicrobial resistance schemes supporting NHS acute providers to implement the five-year UK Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) national action plan in 2019/20.

The NHS Standard Contract now includes a target of reducing total antibiotic consumption by 1%, from the 2018 baseline, by the end of Q4 2019/20 Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) indicators now includes improving the management of lower urinary tract infections in older people and improving appropriate use of antibiotic surgical prophylaxis in elective colorectal surgery.

Full detail at NHS Improvement

Patient involvement in the implementation of infection prevention and control guidelines

Fernandes Agreli H, Murphy M, Creedon S, et al. | Patient involvement in the implementation of infection prevention and control guidelines and associated interventions: a scoping review | BMJ Open | 2019 | doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-025824

Objective To explore patient involvement in the implementation of infection prevention and control (IPC) guidelines and associated interventions.

Design Scoping review.

Methods A methodological framework was followed to identify recent publications on patient involvement in the implementation of IPC guidelines and interventions. Initially, relevant databases were searched to identify pertinent publications (published 2013–2018). Reflecting the scarcity of included studies from these databases, a bidirectional citation chasing approach was used as a second search step. The reference list and citations of all identified papers from databases were searched to generate a full list of relevant references. A grey literature search of Google Scholar was also conducted.

Results From an identified 2078 papers, 14 papers were included in this review. Our findings provide insights into the need for a fundamental change to IPC, from being solely the healthcare professionals (HCPs) responsibility to one that involves a collaborative relationship between HCPs and patients. This change should be underpinned by a clear understanding of patient roles, potential levels of patient involvement in IPC and strategies to overcome barriers to patient involvement focusing on theprofessional–patient relationship (eg, patient encouragement through multimodal educational strategies and efforts to disperse professional’s power).

Conclusions There is limited evidence regarding the best strategies to promote patient involvement in the implementation of IPC interventions and guidelines. The findings of this review endorse the need for targeted strategies to overcome the lack of role clarity of patients in IPC and the power imbalances between patients and HCPs.

Full document available at BMJ Open