Sepsis e-learning resource

Health Education England have launched an e-learning resource for executive, non-executive and management level staff in trusts on sepsis, incorporating antimicrobial resistance and stewardship.

The learning resource and training programme is designed specifically for boards and senior leaders. It introduces the NHS clinical priorities on these areas and explains how non-clinical leaders can help to improve how we approach sepsis and antimicrobial resistance.

123,000 cases of sepsis occur in England each year with approximately 37,000 deaths annually: this is more than breast, bowel and prostate cancers combined. Prompt recognition of sepsis and rapid intervention will help reduce the number of deaths occurring annually.

The learning materials that are available via this new resource support the early identification and management of sepsis and consists of the following five sessions:

  • Session 1 – Overview of Sepsis
  • Session 2 – Adult Sepsis
  • Session 3 – Childhood Sepsis
  • Session 4 – Complex Sepsis Issues and Future Development
  • Session 5 – Sepsis, Care Homes and the Frail Elderly

Further infomation and how to access the e-learning resource at Health Education England

NHS Long Term Plan to reduce toll of ‘hidden killer’ sepsis

Hospital staff urged to be more alert to ‘hidden killer’ sepsis | via NHS England

Hospital staff must alert senior doctors if patients with suspected sepsis do not respond to treatment within an hour, as part of the NHS Long Term Plan to save thousands more lives. Every trust must take action to spot and treat the killer blood condition, which costs 37,000 lives a year, under guidance that is being mandated by NHS England.

The guidance, drawn up with the Royal College of Physicians, The Royal College of GPs, NICE and the UK Sepsis Trust, states that staff should look for sepsis at an early stage in patients coming to A&Es and those who are already on wards.

Medics must ask consultants for help if patients with suspected sepsis do not respond to treatment within an hour, and hospital teams should also take sufficient note of non-specific symptoms and concerns expressed by relatives and carers such as acute changes in behaviour.

Hospitals will be contractually obliged to ensure they fully comply with the guidance coming in from April.  The initiative comes as the NHS prepares to pilot new clinical standards aimed at providing swifter diagnosis and treatment for patients arriving at A&E with suspected sepsis.

Full story at NHS England

Related guidance: Sepsis guidance implementation advice for adults

Infection control precautions

Standard infection control precautions: national hand hygiene and personal protective equipment policy | NHS Improvement

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This national policy is a practice guide for NHS healthcare staff of all disciplines in all care settings. It covers responsibilities for organisations, staff and infection prevention and control teams. It also sets out how and when to decontaminate hands.

The national policy aims to:

  • support a common understanding (making the right thing easy to do for every patient, every time)
  • reduce variation in practice and standardise care processes
  • improve how knowledge and skills are applied in infection prevention and control
  • help reduce the risk of healthcare-associated infection
  • help to align practice, education, monitoring, quality improvement and scrutiny

Full document: Standard infection control precautions: national hand hygiene and personal protective equipment policy