[NICE Consultation] Healthcare-associated infections: prevention and control

NICE | September 2019 | Healthcare-associated infections: prevention and control

The Public health guideline on Healthcare-associated infections: prevention and control (PH36) has been checked by NICE for the need for update.   NICE is now seeking responses in its consultation on this guideline, it is open until  5pm on Friday, 20 September 2019.

Full details from NICE

Healthcare-associated infections: prevention and control

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Hundreds of lives saved through new technology to spot sepsis

The NHS has saved hundreds of people from sepsis thanks to better use of digital technology in hospitals | NHS England

In a major nationwide push to tackle sepsis, including a one hour identification and treatment ambition, new ‘alert and action’ technology is being introduced which uses algorithms to read patients’ vital signs and alert medics to worsening conditions that are a warning sign of sepsis.

Sepsis – also known as blood poisoning – is a life-threatening response to an infection in the body, where the immune system damages tissues and organs.

Three leading hospitals are using alerts to help identify sepsis and tell doctors when patients with the serious condition are getting worse..

NHS leaders in Cambridge, Liverpool and Berkshire are now helping the rest of the health service to adopt tools to spot it, which costs 37,000 lives a year and is notoriously difficult to identify.

In Liverpool, the hospital’s digital system brings together lab results and patient observations into one place to help staff diagnose and treat suspected sepsis, saving up to 200 lives a year.

In Cambridge, deaths from sepsis have fallen consistently over the last three years, with at least 64 lives saved in the past year thanks to the innovative alert and action feature.

In Berkshire since introducing a digital system, the Trust has increased screening rates by 70% with nine in 10 patients now consistently screened for sepsis during admission as opposed to two in ten beforehand, allowing doctors to spot more cases sooner.

Full story at NHS England

MMR catch-up for 10 to 11 year old children: information for GPs

This leaflet provides resources for GP practices to support the Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) catch-up programme | Public Health England

In April 2019, NHS England and the BMA General Practitioners Committee (GPC) agreed to a catch-up campaign for the Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine.

The campaign includes checking and updating the child’s computerised records and inviting those children missing one or both doses of the MMR to make an appointment.

The leaflet can be viewed here

 

WHO Report: No Time to Wait- Securing the future from drug-resistant infections

World Health Organization | May 2019 | No Time to Wait: Securing the future from drug-resistant infections

A new report from WHO- No Time to Wait: Securing the future from drug-resistant infections– makes recommendations for urgent action in the global response to antimicrobial resistance.

No Time to Wait: Securing the future from drug-resistant infections

Antimicrobial resistance: 2019/20 improvement schemes

Joint NHS England and NHS Improvement Medical Director Professor Stephen Powis has written to CCG Directors of Quality, Nursing and Medicines Optimisation about two new antimicrobial resistance schemes supporting NHS acute providers to implement the five-year UK Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) national action plan in 2019/20.

The NHS Standard Contract now includes a target of reducing total antibiotic consumption by 1%, from the 2018 baseline, by the end of Q4 2019/20 Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) indicators now includes improving the management of lower urinary tract infections in older people and improving appropriate use of antibiotic surgical prophylaxis in elective colorectal surgery.

Full detail at NHS Improvement

Patient involvement in the implementation of infection prevention and control guidelines

Fernandes Agreli H, Murphy M, Creedon S, et al. | Patient involvement in the implementation of infection prevention and control guidelines and associated interventions: a scoping review | BMJ Open | 2019 | doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-025824

Objective To explore patient involvement in the implementation of infection prevention and control (IPC) guidelines and associated interventions.

Design Scoping review.

Methods A methodological framework was followed to identify recent publications on patient involvement in the implementation of IPC guidelines and interventions. Initially, relevant databases were searched to identify pertinent publications (published 2013–2018). Reflecting the scarcity of included studies from these databases, a bidirectional citation chasing approach was used as a second search step. The reference list and citations of all identified papers from databases were searched to generate a full list of relevant references. A grey literature search of Google Scholar was also conducted.

Results From an identified 2078 papers, 14 papers were included in this review. Our findings provide insights into the need for a fundamental change to IPC, from being solely the healthcare professionals (HCPs) responsibility to one that involves a collaborative relationship between HCPs and patients. This change should be underpinned by a clear understanding of patient roles, potential levels of patient involvement in IPC and strategies to overcome barriers to patient involvement focusing on theprofessional–patient relationship (eg, patient encouragement through multimodal educational strategies and efforts to disperse professional’s power).

Conclusions There is limited evidence regarding the best strategies to promote patient involvement in the implementation of IPC interventions and guidelines. The findings of this review endorse the need for targeted strategies to overcome the lack of role clarity of patients in IPC and the power imbalances between patients and HCPs.

Full document available at BMJ Open

Sepsis e-learning resource

Health Education England have launched an e-learning resource for executive, non-executive and management level staff in trusts on sepsis, incorporating antimicrobial resistance and stewardship.

The learning resource and training programme is designed specifically for boards and senior leaders. It introduces the NHS clinical priorities on these areas and explains how non-clinical leaders can help to improve how we approach sepsis and antimicrobial resistance.

123,000 cases of sepsis occur in England each year with approximately 37,000 deaths annually: this is more than breast, bowel and prostate cancers combined. Prompt recognition of sepsis and rapid intervention will help reduce the number of deaths occurring annually.

The learning materials that are available via this new resource support the early identification and management of sepsis and consists of the following five sessions:

  • Session 1 – Overview of Sepsis
  • Session 2 – Adult Sepsis
  • Session 3 – Childhood Sepsis
  • Session 4 – Complex Sepsis Issues and Future Development
  • Session 5 – Sepsis, Care Homes and the Frail Elderly

Further infomation and how to access the e-learning resource at Health Education England