Pneumonia (hospital-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing

NICE |February 2019| Pneumonia (hospital-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing | In development [GID-NG10129]

The consultation Pneumonia (hospital-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing [GID-NG10129]is open until 11 March 2019 at 5pm

Full details are available from NICE

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Pneumonia (community-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing

NICE | February 2019 |Pneumonia (community-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing In development [GID-NG10130]

The consultation on Pneumonia (community-acquired): antimicrobial prescribing is open until 11 March 2019 at 5pm.

Full details are available from NICE

Improving infection control practices of nurse anesthetists

Plemmons, Molly M. et al. | Improving infection control practices of nurse anesthetists in the anesthesia workspace | American Journal of Infection Control | published online January 18th 2019

Abstract
Background
Anesthesia providers commonly cross-contaminate their workspace and subsequently put patients at risk for a health care-acquired infection. The primary objective of this project was to determine if education and implementation of standardized infection control guidelines that address evidence-based best practices would improve compliance with infection control procedures in the anesthesia workspace.

Methods
Patient care-related hand hygiene of nurse anesthetists was observed in 3 areas of anesthesia practice before and 3 weeks and 3 months after staff education, placement of visual reminders, and the implementation of infection control guidelines. After the observation periods, the percent compliance on the part of the providers was calculated for each of the 3 areas of anesthesia practice, and the results were compared using the Fisher exact test.

Results
There were a total of 95 observations performed during the 3 observation periods. When compared with preimplementation baseline data, there was a 26.2% increase in the number of providers compliant with hand hygiene practices after airway instrumentation (P = .029) and a 71.9% increase in the number of providers who separated clean from contaminated items in the workspace (P = .0001).

Conclusions
Education, visual reminders, and standardized infection control guidelines were shown to improve compliance with infection control best practices in a group of nurse anesthetists.

 

UK 5-year action plan for antimicrobial resistance 2019 to 2024

Department of Health and Social Care | January 2019 | UK 5-year action plan for antimicrobial resistance 2019 to 2024

Ambitions and actions for the next 5 years, supporting the 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

This 5-year national action plan supports the UK 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance.

Related:

UK 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance

UK-China partnerships against antimicrobial resistance get funding

UK-China partnerships against antimicrobial resistance get funding

Department of Health and Social Care, Innovate UK & UK Research and Innovation| January 2019 | UK-China partnerships against antimicrobial resistance get funding

The UK’s innovation agency, Innovate UK has just announced the winners of two research competitions to address the issue of infections resistant to antibiotics both in humans and in animals.

On behalf of the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC), Innovate UK has completed two research competitions that will award £20 million of research funding for AMR research. This includes a bilateral research competition between DHSC’s Global AMR Innovation Fund  (GAMRIF) and the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), and a competition as part of the Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI).

Funding announced today demonstrates co-operation between UK and China to address the issue of antibiotic resistance.

The full news release can be read at Department of Health and Social Care 

Related: Funding opportunity available to UK and Chinese researchers to help tackle antimicrobial resistance (AMR)

UK 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance

Department of Health and Social Care | January 2019 | UK 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance

This policy paper outlines how the UK will contribute to containing and controlling antimicrobial resistance (AMR) by 2040.

The vision and plan were developed across the government, its agencies and administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, with support from a range of stakeholders (Source: Department of Health and Social Care).

Impact of a simulation-based training in hand hygiene with alcohol-based hand rub in emergency departments

Ghazali, A. D. et al |2018|  Impact of a simulation-based training in hand hygiene with alcohol-based hand rub in emergency departments| Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology| 39|11| P. 1347-1352.

The journal of Infection Control and Epidemiology has published an article that assesses hand hygiene before and following simulation-based training.

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Abstract 

Background
Hand hygiene is the primary measure for reducing nosocomial infections based on 7 steps recommended by the WHO. The aim of this study was to assess the duration and the quality of hand hygiene before and after simulation-based training (SBT).

Methods
The study took place in a University Hospital Pediatric Department among its residents and nurses. In assessment A, 10 hand-rubbing procedures per participant during a work day were scored by observers using a validated, anatomically based assessment scale. Two weeks later, all participants received a didactic course and SBT, followed 1 month later by assessment B, observation of 10 hand-rubbing procedures. Assessments were performed by 2 independent observers. Before-and-after testing was used to evaluate the demonstration of theoretical knowledge.

Results

In total, 22 participants were included, for whom 438 hand hygiene procedures were assessed: 218 for assessment A and 220 for assessment B. The duration of hand rubbing increased from 31.16 seconds in assessment A to 35.75 seconds in assessment B. In assessment A, participants averaged 6.33 steps, and in assessment B, participants averaged 6.03 steps (difference not significant). Significant improvement in scores was observed between assessments A and B, except for the dorsal side of the right hand. The wrist and interdigital areas were the least-cleaned zones. A difference between assessments A and B was observed for nail varnish but not for long nails or jewelry. Theoretical scores increased from 2.83 to 4.29.

Conclusion

This study revealed that an optimal number of steps were performed during hand-rubbing procedures and that SBT improved the duration and quality of hand hygiene, except for the dorsal right side. Emphasis should be placed on the specific hand areas that remained unclean after regular hand-rubbing procedures.

Rotherham NHS staff can request this article here